Pantone / Adobe copyright issues

bteifeld

Substratia Consulting,Printing,Ergosoft Reseller
If you own an Xrite color measurement device like an i1pro{1,2,3}, and you have a copy
of Pantone Color Manager(which can be downloaded from
https://www.pantone.com/customer-service/software-download), you
can still create CGATS, ASE, and/or ACB files which can be loaded into whatever software you please
to get all the L*a*b* numbers for Pantone fan deck colors.

For as long as Pantone Color Manager continues to function despite it being deprecated, and if you have
an xrite color measurement device, you will have no problems being able to use Pantone fan
deck data in your existing workflows, be it in the design software or a RIP.
 
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CanuckSigns

Active Member
I guess I'll have to subscribe. I just don't see how I can continue to do graphics work without my 17-3938 Pantone Color of the Year (2022). Very Peri has stolen my heart.
Lol, directly from the pantone colour of the year site:

Displaying a carefree confidence and a daring curiosity that animates our creative spirit, inquisitive and intriguing PANTONE 17-3938 Very Peri helps us to embrace this altered landscape of possibilities, opening us up to a new vision as we rewrite our lives. Rekindling gratitude for some of the qualities that blue represents complemented by a new perspective that resonates today, PANTONE 17-3938 Very Peri places the future ahead in a new light.


Who comes up with this ****?
 

stxrmxn

New Member
Adobe can "F" themselves right along with the owners of Pantone. Just another monthly vampire on your bottom line. "Just the cost of doing business" response I hear is getting old and way overused.

Going to be interesting when the "just the cost of doing business" people end up in a perpetual subscription hamster wheel.
I have a feeling it won't be long before you will no longer buy equipment but lease it and then have to pay monthly for the features you need.
Glad I'm on my way out.

You will own nothing and like it...
What was the car that recently made you subscribe to turn the heated seat function on.
 

TrustMoore_TN

Sign & Graphics Business Consultant
Onyx is trying to address this in ver 22 with the ONYX Color Reference Library. Since there is a plug-in in Illustrator, the design team can use the ONYX colors in the design process. I had an in-depth conversation with them about this, and it will be a mess when Adobe/Panton pulls the trigger. The workaround will be that companies that need a color match will need to provide a printed color reference or reference a Pantone color that you reference in a color deck, then use the Onyx Color Reference Library and the swatch function to dial in color, then save that swatch in the artwork. (simplified explanation, I know...)

1659823239200.png
 

Notarealsignguy

Arial - it's almost helvetica
Onyx is trying to address this in ver 22 with the ONYX Color Reference Library. Since there is a plug-in in Illustrator, the design team can use the ONYX colors in the design process. I had an in-depth conversation with them about this, and it will be a mess when Adobe/Panton pulls the trigger. The workaround will be that companies that need a color match will need to provide a printed color reference or reference a Pantone color that you reference in a color deck, then use the Onyx Color Reference Library and the swatch function to dial in color, then save that swatch in the artwork. (simplified explanation, I know...)

View attachment 160809
Seems like Pantone is just shooting themselves in the foot. It won't be the first corporation that hastens their demise. Hope to see them in a business text book in the future.
 

ikarasu

Active Member
I don't see it hurting pantone much to be honest. Lets face it - the only people who use pantones are people in the business... the average household user doesn't use them, unless they walk into a business that does and then they end up selecting a pantone from that business's book.

I despise having to pay to get the connect plugin - but our 2 graphics artists as well as production managers shrug and say they need it, so we have to.... and theyre right. All the major companies use pantones in their branding...and there isnt really another choice. You think any major company is going to goto lab values?

Do you think anyone is going to change their workflow rather than pay the $5 a month to get pantones back? We thought Adobe was shooting themselves in the foot when they started to charge $50 per user vs just buying the software.... look how much that hurt adobe. Subscriptions are the way of the future, it sucks - but even if adobe loses some market share to... no one, because they have no competitors, they still end up making more money.


$100 a month for Enroute - 3X Adobe subscriptions at $50 a month... $100ish for Onyx advantage, whats another $18 so we don't have to drop one of our mostly used workflow pieces?

it sucks! But I bet 90% of the people on here will pay the sub fee, or find a way around it and keep using pantones.

Such as saving your colorbook and just importing it once / if they remove it from already installed systems.... ;)
 

WildWestDesigns

New Member
I have to wonder just how much is generated for Adobe via CC now that they also have that marketing service, that's really all about data mining as well. It still may pale in comparison, but I do have to wonder.

I would argue that Adobe's rule now is more about perception than anything for a lot of people. Sure, for some there are some workflows that really do still depend on Adobe, but I would say that that is still a smaller niche group compared to all those that subscribe to Adobe. People believe that they have to have X when in quite a lot of times, it's technically not the case as much as they would think that it is. Especially if one is not really needing to accept outside files (I would say that's the single biggest reason why people "need" Adobe, the other is that they are more or less familiar with the Adobe workflow and don't really want to change (I'm guilty of this as well depending on the software)). Features, while some features may not be available in the open source variant, some features do (even ones that some didn't originally think that they do), and while they may be implemented differently (for one reason or another) they do still exist. Now if one wants to debate UX about how those features are implemented that's something else. Just think of how many people have that perception of using Adobe or bust? Shoot there are some on here that it is either Mac or bust as well. And I think just in general people think open source is lacking in quality (and for some, that is the case and that also applies to lack in quality for pay programs as well, even ones that were once good).

Also given the age of Adobe suite of programs, there is a lot of technical debt that does not exist in younger programs (same thing with Corel as well and they have their own issues from what I have been hearing).

Times change, what really worked when people learned things whatever time period may not exactly hold true today. Change with the times or the times change you.


As to open source pantone colors, yes there are such things. Typically they are in the .gpl format (no not the license) and most open source programs can use those as swatches. Depending on what one is converting over and what resources that are available determines how much of an effort that it is. But yes, efforts along those lines have been going on, for a long time actually. I have had pantone swatches in Inkscape since 2015. The oldest version of this swatch came from 2011 or 2012, can't remember. Although, I actually use Blender for 2D vector graphics now (not something that I would suggest for everyone though, but it does work and I like it better compared to Inkscape).

As to what will happen with Adobe programs after Pantone is culled from there. I look to how they handled the Dolby issue. It is far easier for those on SaaS to control things. Easily force people on to versions that don't support Pantone, in an update, look for those pantone swatch files and remove them periodically (gotta love perpetually connected programs) for those that still may be using those older program versions. And I would say that the checking and removing would probably be more than just once, probably have some regular check in as well. Those are just two things that pop right into my mind. It could also be probable to eliminate just how easy it is for those older program versions (that are CC and still supported at this time) can read those files even if one did re-import them with an update. I'm sure that there exist easier methods compared to what I'm thinking about depending on how everything is handled.
 
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Boudica

I'm here for educational purposes.
Onyx is trying to address this in ver 22 with the ONYX Color Reference Library. Since there is a plug-in in Illustrator, the design team can use the ONYX colors in the design process. I had an in-depth conversation with them about this, and it will be a mess when Adobe/Panton pulls the trigger. The workaround will be that companies that need a color match will need to provide a printed color reference or reference a Pantone color that you reference in a color deck, then use the Onyx Color Reference Library and the swatch function to dial in color, then save that swatch in the artwork. (simplified explanation, I know...)

View attachment 160809
So this is interesting. Not sure if it's actually related, but just this morning I started getting a pop up warning from Onyx that says color check will expire in 6 days. I've never really used it, so big deal, but it made me think of this thread. On a side note, I clicked on color check and under Verification Expiration: Never Expires. lol.
 

WildWestDesigns

New Member
That's the irony, even with program that had a perpetual license. Terms/conditions can/may be changed, with little to no notice.

Want to really see EULA changes done dirty, look at what's going on with Our Machinery. Now, I believe that they are closing up shop, but something like this can easily happen with more financially stable companies and who is willing to deal with what "you" would have to deal with to get something liked that changed? SaaS just makes things easier to tighten control for the OEM.

I personally would suggest, if able/willing etc, to minimize how much subscription software (I would prefer to actually go more specific than that, but I'll control myself in that regard) that one is on. While still may have to contend with activation servers etc down the road, it would atleast mitigate on the fly changes for as long as one can. But for better or worse, SaaS does seem to be where commercial closed source software is going (and if there are significantly used features that are licensed by the software OEM from another company, that just adds to the concern that it could be dropped at any version for pretty much any reason), even if they don't do it now, no promises that they won't later. Irony some companies used to promote the fact that they still had a perpetual license and not just a few yrs later, pushing subscription over perpetual and give the feeling that they really want to get rid of perpetual.
 
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