Cutting 3mil ACM - Colex SHARPCUT Pro SXC 1732

KBMedia

New Member
We recently purchased a "Colex SHARPCUT Pro SXC 1732" . We have found some inconsistencies with the finish recently.
Edges appeared to be frayed somewhat.
To date, we have only routered approx 10-15 Sheets (with approx. 240 linear inches per sheet) with an upcut T00530 bit.
The first 5-6 sheets seemed to cut well and the balanced needed to be filed to smooth the edges. Recommended speeds and X Y movement were used.
My question is twofold. Have other users experienced the same and changed their bits after 1000 -1500 linear inches of cutting?
Or would anyone have any recommendations?
 

KBMedia

New Member
I'd look up ACM cutting threads in here and get on the phone with Colex about the problem.
Thank you, yes we have. I was told by one of the techs that we should be changing the bit every 5-6 sheets. I thought this was highly unusual in comparison to other machines we have worked with. We just wondered if others users of this machine were experiencing the same use rate?
 

Gino

Premium Subscriber
I know nothing about your machine or most others, but when using saws or any cutting tools, it's always best to go slow. Not RPMs, but forward motion. Rather than forcing the machine to cut, allow the machine to cut and advance at a reduced speed, thus prolonging the life of everything. Plus, less problems on the back end.
 

johnnysigns

New Member
That's crazy to be changing that often on ACM. Again, I'd search some ACM posts on here. There's a bunch of them with recommendations
 

Print1

Technician for your colex and printer needs
We recently purchased a "Colex SHARPCUT Pro SXC 1732" . We have found some inconsistencies with the finish recently.
Edges appeared to be frayed somewhat.
To date, we have only routered approx 10-15 Sheets (with approx. 240 linear inches per sheet) with an upcut T00530 bit.
The first 5-6 sheets seemed to cut well and the balanced needed to be filed to smooth the edges. Recommended speeds and X Y movement were used.
My question is twofold. Have other users experienced the same and changed their bits after 1000 -1500 linear inches of cutting?
Or would anyone have any recommendations?
Use the factory settings for dibond with the t00500 bit will give you butter smooth edges and last a very long time.
You can also use the tpp502 bit after you’ve used on acrylic.

It’s 24000 rpm at 70-100ipm.
 

JBurton

Signtologist
WTF, those bits are crazy expensive. Belin makes a fine bit that will cut until somebody runs it into the table, 33317A is an 1/8"diameter, 5/16" CEL upcut bit that I use on .125" aluminum with mist, then turn around and cut down sheets of ACM at 22K / 200IPM
 

citysignshop

New Member
I'm not sure why they'd recommend an up-cut? straight works for me on most all ACM etc.
- lots of cooling air, keep the feed rate high enough that it doesn't melt the core of course
-. if you can afford the time for a second pass, run the first at about + .010" oversize, then the final pass is just trimming off the burr.
.....still waaaaaaaay faster than hand-finishing! good luck!...you'll get it nailed!
 

FireSprint.com

Trade Only Screen & Digital Sign Printing
So it's odd, but one of the things we realized after a while on our zund is that we were cutting too slow. Just about every time, slowing down and running more passes leads to a cleaner cut and longer bit life, but not for our setup with ACM. We switched to a 2 pass and went as fast as we run PVC and suddenly our bits started cutting 20 boards and deburring was minimal. Seems like moving quick enough so that the core and even the aluminum doesn't heat up is the key.

Not sure if you will find the same results, but might be worth a try.
 
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