Holding Down Thin Materials

dlndesign

Active Member
We are running a job that requires a .040 styrene on our Teckwin Flatbed Printer. As we are noticing certain styrene pieces due to the rolling of the material, curve up and the heads strike them when this occurs. The size of these pieces are 4" x 4", we decided to go this route by having them pre-cut due to the fact they have holes drilled and we didn't want to have the print chip if we cut and drilled it from a sheet. I can also attribute this to the fact that the UV lamps may also be heating the material to the point it curves up and looses suction.
So my question is for small pieces of material like this, is there a better way to gain a better hold on the material to keep it from popping up?

Thanks!
 

dlndesign

Active Member
I can see that working somewhat, but I am also looking for easy clean up and since I have not tested that, I wouldn't know if that would pull up ink if I do a second side. What are your experiences with it?

But I am also thinking, is there a low tac material that I could use that would have re-adhesion properties, if I were to print multiple jobs, without having to clean it each time?
 

MGraphics

Member
should have done it in large sheets and let sit for a few days so it had time to harden and then cut and drill... and yes this stuff is very heat sensitive.... i do my styrene at half lamps and it still wants to warp sometimes....
 
I used to use small squares of low tack thin double sided tape at the corners when I would be printing on material that likes to curl. It would stick to the print table better than the substrate so I could use it over and over.
 

ChicagoGraphics

Major Contributor
I wonder if you couldn't use that rubbery material they use in kitchens, it's a non-slip material so what ever you put on it, it does not slide around. I just don't know the name of it.
 

rubo

Member
I can see that working somewhat, but I am also looking for easy clean up and since I have not tested that, I wouldn't know if that would pull up ink if I do a second side. What are your experiences with it?

But I am also thinking, is there a low tac material that I could use that would have re-adhesion properties, if I were to print multiple jobs, without having to clean it each time?
My experience is with waterbased inks - don't know about your setup - I finish one side (ie, clear-coat), let it dry then go for the other side. I use a low tack waterbased spray adhesive from Aaron bros - don't remember the brand, but the clear is easy to clean afterwards - just wipe w a wet cloth. Good luck!
 

cwb143

Member
As stated above. Print everything first on a larger sheet. whatever makes sense 4x8 4'x4' 3'x4' whatever. then cut it out.
 
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