Question HP Latex Printer - Banner material for cold (below 0) and windy conditions

BryceG

New Member
While I have had a wide format printer for a few years, I have only done indoor posters and banners. Now I have a HP 335 Latex Printer and have started printing outdoor banners, beginning this winter and not happy with the product I produced for the customer.

What banner materials (solid and mesh) are available that can be installed in freezing conditions, can handle below zero temperatures, say -20 degrees, and windy conditions?

When google searching, a number of material descriptions say that it can handle "harsh" weather conditions without defining it. I printed multiple 4' x 8' banners on Toughcoat material for a customer and they installed it. It cracked when it was being unfolded at the installation sites.

Even though the material I printed on has a Service Temperature Range of -40 to 176 degrees, it cracked when the temperature was slightly below zero.

Finally, is there a list of manufacturers/brands in addition to Fisher Textiles, (found while searching this site)? I keep finding suppliers or private named product.

Thank you.
 

bannertime

Active Member
I'm in Texas so I can't exactly help you, but I do have a question. There are a few different types of Toughcoat materials. I don't use these and I'm not familiar with them, but it looks like it goes from 9mil poly to 18oz scrim and everything in between. Which one are you using?
 

bowtievega

New Member
One, I don’t think I would fold up the banners, makes a a hard crease which is never good. Make sure to roll them up. Is there a tyvek type material people are making banners with? I thought someone was offering a polyethylene material that might be better in the cold.
 

Ere

New Member
I am in Colorado. I use Arlon 313. I tell them they would be lucky if it lasts between 1-2 years because of the sun and cold. I have an HP latex 115. I wanted to use thick material but it won’t work with the Latex printer. Better safe than sorry. Make sure they don’t have unreasonable expectations. I told my customer I would rather have them spend half the money and do them every year on the cheaper thickness. The sun will make them look old after a year anyway. Just make sure you don’t ruin your printheads trying to fit material that isn’t within specs of the printer. Good luck.
 

BryceG

New Member
Understood. Will instruct customers not to fold the banners.

Thank you on the idea of looking at Tyvek as an option. Some product specs that says the material is unaffected by temperature extremes and latex compatible. In other places it say aqueous or water based printers. Then the spec sheet for HP Durable Synthetic Banner material states Operating Temperature of 59 to 95 degrees, (so which is it for temperature). This material lists the Designjet as the printer as being compatible. So not sure if can be used on latex printers.
 

BryceG

New Member
I'm in Texas so I can't exactly help you, but I do have a question. There are a few different types of Toughcoat materials. I don't use these and I'm not familiar with them, but it looks like it goes from 9mil poly to 18oz scrim and everything in between. Which one are you using?
it was 16 mil LexJet TOUGHcoat.
 

BryceG

New Member
I am in Colorado. I use Arlon 313. I tell them they would be lucky if it lasts between 1-2 years because of the sun and cold. I have an HP latex 115. I wanted to use thick material but it won’t work with the Latex printer. Better safe than sorry. Make sure they don’t have unreasonable expectations. I told my customer I would rather have them spend half the money and do them every year on the cheaper thickness. The sun will make them look old after a year anyway. Just make sure you don’t ruin your printheads trying to fit material that isn’t within specs of the printer. Good luck.
Thank you for that brand name and I will check the specs.
 

bannertime

Active Member
it was 16 mil LexJet TOUGHcoat.

That's a pretty decent product. Best best is to stop folding banners. You can do something like an HDPE/tyvek, but you still shouldn't fold. Banners are essentially plastic, and when you try to "reform" them at the extremes of their operating temperature, they're going to crack or stretch. If you must fold one, then you'll need to let it warm up indoors or in a vehicle before trying to handle it in sub zero temps.
 

JBurton

Signtologist
I used to use HP HDPE banner material. It looks like garbage, but holds up very well. It was also very finicky in the L25500, until a firmware update that kept the vacuum from jumping up pressure everytime it did it's final check on the printer after printing. Once we figured that out, I quit buying it.
 

Ere

New Member
Call the place you are buying it from and ask them if the latex printer will melt the material. Design jets do not have heated dryers.
 

JBurton

Signtologist
Even do a test. Try folding vs rolling a banner and see what happens. Never heard of a folded banner before.
Not on a banner, but our billboard faces come folded. They fold them in a very particular way though, so no ink touches ink, but folded nonetheless.
 
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