New monitor, Any Recommendations?

WildWestDesigns

New Member
Just get a viewsonic, no sense in spending hundreds of bucks for the overpriced top of the line stuff, always had the best luck with them
Viewsonics are really good monitors.

Wacom27QHD as my main monitor with a Viewsonic 40" 4K monitor.

I am a huge fan of the Wacom's though as well. Huions have come a along way and they are more budget friendly, but in my mind still not there, but depending on everything that one needs, those could be good as well.
 

bob

It's Crackers to Slip a Rozzer the Dropsy in Snide
I've been using flat screen TV's for years. The only real downside, which isn't much, is that in order to turn on/off you need either a remote or you have to reach around back of the unit. Or just leave it on, which is what I do. I realize that a TV doesn't have the precise resolution of an actual monitor but I've never, as in ever, found that to be a problem. I'm laying out signs here, not reproducing the Sistine chapel ceiling. The upside is that a TV costs half or less of an equivalent sized monitor. You can get an insanely large screen for not a lot of money.
 

WildWestDesigns

New Member
is that in order to turn on/off you need either a remote or you have to reach around back of the unit. Or just leave it on, which is what I do.

Most of the TVs that I have dealt with either have them on the side or in the front. They tend to also not be the hard tactile buttons like they used to be.

However, the nice thing about screens nowadays as the need for turning off to keep images from being "burned" into the screen is not quite the same as it once was, so thankfully making sure that there is a screen saver going or turning off isn't a priority as it once as.


I realize that a TV doesn't have the precise resolution of an actual monitor but I've never, as in ever, found that to be a problem.

I guess this would depend on which ones you get. I had some, that just didn't render like a monitor and it felt like it was a TV/Movie focusing on a computer screen. Back in my triple monitor setup days, I had used a TV and that was strictly for streaming entertainment (be it thru my local NAS or thru some streaming service).

But that is just me.

I would imagine though that perhaps the 4ks, even TVs probably wouldn't notice that much of a difference though. The aforementioned TV was a 720 Samsung (before I went in on Viewsonics if it wasn't a Wacom).

I'm laying out signs here, not reproducing the Sistine chapel ceiling. The upside is that a TV costs half or less of an equivalent sized monitor. You can get an insanely large screen for not a lot of money.
The only real downside, and this is more me putting on my tin foil hat, is that alot of TVs are becoming "smart TVs" (not all, but it certainly seems like more and more are, especially around here and I just try to pick something off the shelf) and I just don't think that they should be. At least that's the way it seems with regard to the decently made/priced TVs. Due to that, I have actually gone with monitors instead of TVs for use as TVs. If I want "smart" functionality, I will hook up a PI or a NUC and call it a day. Atleast I would have more control over everything.
 

JamesLam

New Member
I haven't decided yet but I may add another 27" monitor and still use the one I have for accounting and other less graphic related stuff. Unless someone pipes up and says that's a no-no.

If I go with two monitors what is a good quality monitor arm system that is recommended?
 

ewded

New Member
A professional monitor doesn't show gradient when you look at solid colors (most of them are darker on the bottom and lighter at the top). HP's are pretty good like HP 27fw or similar. I use HP Z23N G2. Whatevery you buy make sure it's IPS not VA or TN
 

Pauly

Complete Graphics
I've been using a 32" Samsung 2560 x 1440 since 2014. Recently looked at newer 4k models and decided to stick with the 2560 x 1440 as 4k makes text way too small. Monitors smaller than 32" look so small no idea how people can use smaller monitors

There's a scaling function built into windows 10 for that reason. (Right click - Display settings) and change the scaling.
 

victor bogdanov

New Member
There's a scaling function built into windows 10 for that reason. (Right click - Display settings) and change the scaling.
Yes I'm aware of the scaling function but then kinda defeats the purpose of a 4k monitor if you are enlarging everything. After almost 10 years of using 2560 x 1440 changing wont be easy
 

Pauly

Complete Graphics
Yes I'm aware of the scaling function but then kinda defeats the purpose of a 4k monitor if you are enlarging everything. After almost 10 years of using 2560 x 1440 changing wont be easy
It actually doesn't. Using a higher resolution monitor is all about the pixel density and sharpness of the display. Not how small the text is.

Look at the old iPhone 4. Then look at the new iphone 13's.
Everything, the text, icons are similar sizes, but the screen resolution is far smaller.
Same with TVs. a 1080p tv vs 4k tv. They all display the same size picture, one has more pixels for more definition.

Same principles apply to PCs.

What you're supposed to do is change the scaling to match how a normal display will look. or scale it to your preference.
On larger displays you have less scaling as you don't need everything so big, so you gain more screen real-estate. On smaller screens like my laptop 15" 4k OLED display, the scaling was at 200 or 250% so it's usable.
My 5K ultra wide, i have the scaling to suite.
 

victor bogdanov

New Member
It actually doesn't. Using a higher resolution monitor is all about the pixel density and sharpness of the display. Not how small the text is.

Look at the old iPhone 4. Then look at the new iphone 13's.
Everything, the text, icons are similar sizes, but the screen resolution is far smaller.
Same with TVs. a 1080p tv vs 4k tv. They all display the same size picture, one has more pixels for more definition.

Same principles apply to PCs.

What you're supposed to do is change the scaling to match how a normal display will look. or scale it to your preference.
On larger displays you have less scaling as you don't need everything so big, so you gain more screen real-estate. On smaller screens like my laptop 15" 4k OLED display, the scaling was at 200 or 250% so it's usable.
My 5K ultra wide, i have the scaling to suite.

I could not tell a difference between my 2k Samsung and a newer version that is 4k when both are scaled equally. face probably 3ft away from monitor. Yes 4k more pixels, pixel density etc but I did not see enough of a difference to upgrade
 
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