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Outlines

n20capri

New Member
Probably a stupid question...BUT...
Using Illustrator, how do I create outlines? I can create a stroke (visually)...but when cutting for layers how do I create the font outline (lowest layer) for the layer above? If it was a circle I could just create a slightly larger circle but how do I do it for fonts?
Thanks,
Mike

Example:
 

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uneedasign

New Member
I don't use Adobe much, but I believe you do it like this. In your open window, type your text, go to view and click on stroke, and change the weight setting. Hope that helps.
 

Fred Weiss

Merchant Member
You must first convert your type to outlines by clicking on Type > Create Outlines with the type selected.

Next click on Object > Path > Outline Stroke
 

n20capri

New Member
Fred Weiss said:
You must first convert your type to outlines by clicking on Type > Create Outlines with the type selected.

Next click on Object > Path > Outline Stroke

Awesome...
:thankyou:
 

OldPaint

New Member
no wonder i like corel....to make outlines in corel you set the pen size to "hairline" and youre good ta go....
 

Deaton Design

New Member
Another way to do it in illustrator, and I use this way all the time, is to first set your type, go to type, create outline, which basically converts it to curves, then go to object, path, offset path, and type in a number. Depending on what size you are working, I usually put in anything from 0.02 to0.09. You can experiment with the size to get what you want. After you make the outline, go to pathfinder, and weld it together. WHen you weld it, sometimes the program will bring the outline to front, but just send it to back and you're ready. You can add smaller outlines to the bigger one in different colors to give a nice look.:)
 

n20capri

New Member
Here's another one...lol. When not selected the black line appears to be one...but when it get's cut, the cutter cuts that little triangle where the 2 lines meet...from a distance it looks ok but up close you can see the cut marks...very annoying...how to I convert this to one line...
Thanks again,
Mike
 

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n20capri

New Member
n20capri said:
Here's another one...lol. When not selected the black line appears to be one...but when it get's cut, the cutter cuts that little triangle where the 2 lines meet...from a distance it looks ok but up close you can see the cut marks...very annoying...how to I convert this to one line...
Thanks again,
Mike

I GOT IT!! lol

Trim and Merge on the Pathfinder palette!!
 

Lance

New Member
I'm with OP.
It may be my lack of experience or maybe be that I don't need to explore all its possibilities, but Illustrator seems to be unnecessarily complicated at times.
'KISS' works for me.
 

Fred Weiss

Merchant Member
Lance said:
I'm with OP.
It may be my lack of experience or maybe be that I don't need to explore all its possibilities, but Illustrator seems to be unnecessarily complicated at times.
'KISS' works for me.
Yes but what OP is describing is not creating a new vector for the outline. He would still have to do that in a different way first. What we're talking about is working with the way most designers create - using strokes instead of vectors for their outlining requirements - and then having a one step command in Illustrator to convert those strokes to vectors.

The benefit of this is that you have a less complex drawing which keeps the strokes (ultimately to be vectors) fully editable until you finally convert them to vectors. It is also useful to know how to do this as you encounter files submitted for production that were created by "designers" and which may need to be made vinyl-ready.

Illustrator files (EPS or AI, and now PDF) are the standard for exchanging of vector files accurately. Corel CDR is not. Whether or not you like it, that is a fact and if you plan to accept files created by others or to create files that will be used by others, you will need to have some knowledge of how Illustrator does things.

The screen shots below demonstrate the use of strokes and their ultimate conversion to vector paths.
 

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GAC05

Quit buggin' me
Corel has a one step option to convert strokes to vector outlines:
Select the text - Arrange tab > "Convert outline to object" (default hotkey is Qtrl+Shift+Q).
Text does not have to be converted to paths (unless you want to - good idea at export time) stroke is a separate vector object and the text can still be edited as text.

wayne k
guam usa
 
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