Raster to Vector?

Jen Goodwin

New Member
I am trying to vectorize an image in Omega that I created in Photoshop. It is a pen and ink drawing that I need to print to Edge positive so that I can burn a screen. Here are my issues.
1. Wanted to print as a bitmap to retain as much detail as possible, but when I print it, I get dots in the print like it isn't 100% black coming from PS.

2. So I try to vectorize in Omega (which I never do, I do it in Flexi) and I get the message "The selected image must be monochrome. Bits per pixel reported: 8. Resample the source image at (1) bit per pixel. HUH?!?

Can someone help me out here? I attached the image so you can see how I need to keep the detail and not have it fill in (warning: it's copyrighted!). It filled in quite a bit vectorizing it in Flexi. Arrrgh!
 
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Fred Weiss

Merchant Member
If you want to use it for burning a screen then you should convert it from the grayscale or other color mode it may be set for to Bitmap. This will force every pixel to be solid black or white. You may want to use Image > Adjust > Threshhold to adjust for the loss of grayscale you will get before converting to Bitmap.

Once you have it as a Bitmap, save it as a TIF and import into Omega. From there select it and go into Image Fill and set the color for Spot Black.

There's no need to vectorize it.
 

Jen Goodwin

New Member
Fred, Buddy... :U Rock:

Do you think that will eliminate the dot pattern when I print it? I had the image as greyscale and I put an image fill of 'spot' - Jet black and it printed a dot throughout the image instead of being a nice solid black image. I could waste edge positive to find out, but with all your wisdom...I figured you would know.

:help: Oh yeah...why tif?
 

Fred Weiss

Merchant Member
What will be printed will be solid pixels. Since it is a one bit bitmap, halftoning does not apply. But if you're concerned, set if to STC Photo and something in the 70 to 90 range for LPI. I don't think it will have any effect.

What you're doing is forcing the image to it's most basic form because you are printing it in it's most basic form .... with a stencil. this is why it will be important to carefully examine the amount of filling in that will be occurring in Photoshop by adjusting the threshhold before you drop the grayscale setting.
 

Jen Goodwin

New Member
I changed it to bitmap in PS and zoom in to find it gets tiny white dots all through the image. This image is a PITA. I only have a vellum to scan - I think that is where my 'grey' issue lies.
 

Jen Goodwin

New Member
I did, but apparently not properly :Big Laugh It worked great and it printed black! Yeah, now on to burning screens!!
 
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