Copper sulfate treated Lumber eats aluminum

Larry L

New Member
A few years ago I questioned Laminators about mounting alumilite and luster board into slots made in the new treated lumber made with copper sulfate. They said no problem only to find out several signs had eroded severely. Since then I edge trim all my blanks that will be touching treated lumber or I tell my customers , if they are mounting it using there own lumber to insulate the edge with electrical tape. It has been a hit or miss thing. Some old signs never perhaps had a good contact, and were fine, yet some destroyed.
 

Larry L

New Member

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Pat Whatley

Member
Damn, that's some serious looking deterioration. Thanks for the heads up, I would never have guessed it was the wood if that happened to me.

Is Laminators going to replace the material?
 

Larry L

New Member
Damn, that's some serious looking deterioration. Thanks for the heads up, I would never have guessed it was the wood if that happened to me.

Is Laminators going to replace the material?
They replace the ones I first found, but the total redo's were far more cost to me. I had a batch of material once delaminate but caught it before I used the sheets.
I have a file labeled bad vinyl, I keep all my cases in there including the jobs that had 5 rolls of Avery A8 that went south after 6 months. Orical gold 751, Mactec 9700 cream also.

BTW a contractor tipped me off about aluminum flashing being destroyed that was touching new decks. That's what got me thinking.
 
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Larry L

New Member
It is frustrating when the distributors put all the burden on you and take no responsibility as a middle man. N Glance would not even give me full credit from Orical replacement vinyl to trade on supplies like stripper wheels and Rapid Remover.
 

John L

New Member
There is a lot of aluminum touching PT lumber in the marine industry.. docks, piers, boat lifts, etc. I wonder what their secret is?
 

Billct2

Active Member
I think marine use has more stainless and galvanized (and old fashioned bronze) than aluminum.
I have seen similar corrosion where steel fasteners touch aluminum.
 

jscarl

New Member
When aluminum wireing was first allowed in homes, there was a warning issued about this same thing. It was required that you squeeze a small amount of a thick liquid on the aluminum wire and then go ahead and connect to the copper wires and leads. I cannot remember the name of the liquid. But i can remember using it when i built my home. Maby i had better open the box and take a good look. Thanks for the heads up.
 

andy

New Member
Can you find out how the aluminium skins are processed when applying the colour coat?

From the pictures you posted it looks like the aluminium has been wet sprayed without using a good quality etch primer- I've seen the same kind of paint lift on aluminium before- it was caused by some dumb dumb priming the bare aluminium with bog standard automotive primer- which simply doesn't work.

Aluminium is a bugger to paint and nothing will adhere long term unless the right etching process has been used as a first step to painting or powder coating.
 

Larry L

New Member
Can you find out how the aluminium skins are processed when applying the colour coat?

From the pictures you posted it looks like the aluminium has been wet sprayed without using a good quality etch primer- I've seen the same kind of paint lift on aluminium before- it was caused by some dumb dumb priming the bare aluminium with bog standard automotive primer- which simply doesn't work.

Aluminium is a bugger to paint and nothing will adhere long term unless the right etching process has been used as a first step to painting or powder coating.

I used Laminators' luster board. I also had Alumilite erode away.
It is the copper that makes an electric pull on the aluminum. The paint has nothing to do with it since the bare edges were touching the copper in the wood.
 

Larry L

New Member
I'm surprised Laminators/ Nudo, do not put warnings about this. I remember to Avery A8 catastrophe, I had 5 rolls of different colors go bad. They did not warn anybody about it after they knew they screwed up and the material was being used. My distributor also was told to be quite about it, in the mean time were putting crap on all sorts of stuff telling our customers we are using the good stuff. :omg: I know I was hurt by it and was ready to just use calender. I told them you have no problem sending me e mails of what to buy all the time, but not a word of warning. Ya, I was mad about it.
 

digitalwoodshop

New Member
I was working at a local lumber yard when the change over took place and a lot of the old timers just did not believe the bunk about not using steel nails, lag screws and bolts with the new treated. There will be more than a few pressure treated steps dropping through with a person riding it soon...

Home stores sell a 1/8 inch thick rubber with a glue and release paper on the back that can be fabricated to the aluminum sheeting to give some degree of edge protection. It is sold as a 6 inch wide rubber weather proof for windows and doors. It was being used to line double dip galvanized hardware like U shaped wood hangers.

The minimum protection is double dip galvanized but more and more everyone is shifting to stainless steel hardware.

As for aluminum signs and the new pressure treated, it's going to be a mess... I am making a ground sitting parking lot sign with Pressure Treated in the next few weeks and Aluminum is off the list....

AL
 

CheapVehicleWrap

New Member
Aluminum wiring was oulawed in residental construction because it heats up much faster than copper. Knob and tube is actually the safest as you couldn't put a nail through it because it was so far apart.
 

Stealth Ryder

New Member
When aluminum wireing was first allowed in homes, there was a warning issued about this same thing. It was required that you squeeze a small amount of a thick liquid on the aluminum wire and then go ahead and connect to the copper wires and leads. I cannot remember the name of the liquid. But i can remember using it when i built my home. Maby i had better open the box and take a good look. Thanks for the heads up.

Years and years ago I was an electrician, we called this stuff "Pookie"... It keeps the aluminum fro oxidizing...
 
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