Question Does anyone know how these signs are made?

kriscad

New Member
Looking to research what equipment would be needed to make these signs. The corrugated one has got me stumped??

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James Burke

Being a grandpa is more fun than working
I'm going to take a wild guess and say dye sublimation. I have one something similar to the first sign, and I'm pretty sure they're not cutting joint lines after the fact.

As far as the corrugated sign goes, it would require a contoured silicone nest and print pad. The panel would need to be coated for ink receptivity.

But then again....I guess "direct to substrate" is not totally out of the question:
https://www.thesignblog.com.au/the-sign-blog/sign-showcasedirect-printing-onto-corrugated-iron



JB
 
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Solventinkjet

DIY Printer Fixing Guide
I have a customer who makes prints like the first one on his JFX200 flatbed printer. I don't think the bottom one would be feasible on a flat bad so probably agree with above that it's dye sub.
 

James Burke

Being a grandpa is more fun than working
or print it flat and stamp the corrugation after

It would take very sophisticated tooling and presses to stamp a pre-coated sheet...not to mention paints / coatings that don't flake or abrade. It's typically done with appliances such as washers/dryers/ranges, etc...but that is a totally different coating altogether.


JB
 

James Burke

Being a grandpa is more fun than working
Go buy some at Hobby Lobby and re-sell them.

When it comes to philosophy, I absolutely love HL founder David Green's remarks about his own products. He literally claims that there's not one thing in his store that people absolutely "need".

Yes, it's probably true since we can live on bread, water and a few fruits and veggies. But just look what the Covid crisis showed us when it comes to cabin fever and the inability express our creative tendencies.

JB
 

netsol

Member
It would take very sophisticated tooling and presses to stamp a pre-coated sheet...not to mention paints / coatings that don't flake or abrade. It's typically done with appliances such as washers/dryers/ranges, etc...but that is a totally different coating altogether.


JB

james,
about 40 years ago, IMRON had a line of paints that did not flake, they were designed to paint race cars & motorcycles so minor damage could be pounded out and generally avoid repainting

the salesman would come around with painted sheets of aluminum foil. he would crumble them, flatten them out again and the paint was intact and perfect. (then the EPA reared it's ugly head and that was the end of this product line)
 
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