FlexiSign: "Encountered an improper argument."

lbpalm

New Member
And the hits just keep coming...
- Anyone know what this means?
TIA
improper error.PNG
 

The Yanki & The Brit

The Yanki & The Brit Signs and Radio Show
Hahahaha... when I was learning how to build mother boards the old fashioned way, the guy who taught me explained to me that when a connection was made, at IBM they called it a handshake.
This could be the new slang for the fact that it is not reading a file properly.
But I would still blame Joe's wife!
 

netsol

Member
from what i can see this is a SAAS error (software as a service)

flexi is not logging you out properly from your last session (?) or disconnected you and reconnected you REAL QUICK before the systrm knew you were gone


my guess would be very sloppy upgrade on their part. microsoft is using a logoff utility to get around this

http://cs.thomsonreuters.com/ua/netfirm/admin_cs_us_en/virtual_office/log_off_utility.

i am not really sure what you need to do other than contact SAI support
 

DPD

New Member
And the hits just keep coming...
- Anyone know what this means?
TIA
View attachment 148827
It's basically a function call to a subroutine and one of the parameters is the wrong type. What function call depends on what you were doing at the time it happened. Call Sai but those things they usually can't help with because it has to go to the developers. They will tell you to clear preferences or reinstall the software. Hope you get this worked out or it's just a one time memory issue.
 
It's basically a function call to a subroutine and one of the parameters is the wrong type. What function call depends on what you were doing at the time it happened.

More then likely right here. It was expecting something like an INT, FLOAT, maybe even a BOOL and it got something that it wasn't supposed to. In my experience, it's usually trying to do a combination of things that weren't anticipated on doing. Or it could have been a memory leak and a process wasn't closed out that should have been (typically a behind the scenes process, but not always).
 

lbpalm

New Member
from what i can see this is a SAAS error (software as a service)

flexi is not logging you out properly from your last session (?) or disconnected you and reconnected you REAL QUICK before the systrm knew you were gone


my guess would be very sloppy upgrade on their part. microsoft is using a logoff utility to get around this

http://cs.thomsonreuters.com/ua/netfirm/admin_cs_us_en/virtual_office/log_off_utility.

i am not really sure what you need to do other than contact SAI support


No.
I am not running any such cloud version, if that actuality matters - (I don't think so)
 

lbpalm

New Member
It's basically a function call to a subroutine and one of the parameters is the wrong type. What function call depends on what you were doing at the time it happened. Call Sai but those things they usually can't help with because it has to go to the developers. They will tell you to clear preferences or reinstall the software. Hope you get this worked out or it's just a one time memory issue.


After many years of stupid frustration I have concluded that Flexi is pure garbage.
After all, here we all are mostly on win 10 x 64, yet "good old Flexi" is still built & functioning on 32 bit code.
I wish there was a decent alternative.
Anyone?
TIA!
 

netsol

Member
sai is fr from the only company still running a 32 bit version on a 64 bit operating system

for a good long while it had to do with compatability with adobe products

(now it might just be that developing a 64 bit version is damn expensive)
 
sai is fr from the only company still running a 32 bit version on a 64 bit operating system

That pool is getting less and less and given that running a 32 bit program on a 64 bit OS consumers twice as much minimum resources as it would on a 32 bit machine and it still only "sees" a small portion of all potential resources available to it, it's no bueno. Bare in mind too there are no more fully 32bit builds for Windows anymore. Now, the 64 bit versions still have 32bit libs, but they won't be lasting forever. At some point, it will be left up to 3rd parties to have projects that put those libs back in (like one for 16bit libs on a 64 bit Win install).

Really, we have heard the death knell of traditionally licensed software as it is, may as well go fully browser based as it is (and most on here know that I am no fan of the subscription based service). With WASM (native compiled code, I use C++, but just about any compiled code can target this), WebGL able to have damn close native performance.


(now it might just be that developing a 64 bit version is damn expensive)

No, it's not really. If I can go in and run a Qt/C++ app and have it deploy on all 3 major platforms and have it target 32bit and 64 bit with the only difference being the gcc compiler, no, it's not that expensive. And I'm saying that having done projects with just myself doing everything. Given what they charge and the niche industry that they target that's willing to pay that target price, even the cost of the Qt license should be easily made up for and they would actually be able to increase their target audience without having to maintain more then 1 codebase (this is the same framework that is used for Maya and how they are able to target all 3 major desktop platforms). Now, I will say this, it will have a cost to port it to that new framework, but after that, the burden will be eased. At some point they will have to bite the bullet and if they want to do something like AutoCAD did and have their program on the web, have to port it there as well (they at least won't have to deal with the Qt framework then though, so there is that plus).
 

netsol

Member
WWD

i understand all that, when i say expensive, i mostly refer to support costs, the exponential increase in all the technologies you need to be compatable with, and the dizzying rate at which other technologies change. microsoft has become TERRIBLE at providing current info to developers, even channel partners. you hear the horror stories from developers. spending weeks testing, making changes & when microsoft makes a final release, it is practically unrecognizable compared to the "final beta package" they just provided you, that all your changes were based on
 
WWD

i understand all that, when i say expensive, i mostly refer to support costs, the exponential increase in all the technologies you need to be compatable with, and the dizzying rate at which other technologies change. microsoft has become TERRIBLE at providing current info to developers, even channel partners. you hear the horror stories from developers. spending weeks testing, making changes & when microsoft makes a final release, it is practically unrecognizable compared to the "final beta package" they just provided you, that all your changes were based on

I understand and agree with that, the joys of essentially a rolling release, but that would actually make keeping a 32bit system around even more "expensive" because MS could remove those libs at any moment without notice (EULAs provide changes to happen without notice to the end user). It actually makes more sense to target the web as that is one of the few things that change is glacial and still have somewhat legacy support. There are few exceptions like flash etc, but for the most part, there is far more legacy with the web now then with any OS currently on the market.
 
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