How to properly align graphics on a car?

brdesign

Premium Subscriber
Follow the bodylines
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visual800

Member
The bottom of the freaking vehicle is level! The bottom of doors is level. I dont give a damn if the back of the vehicle jacked up 5" you letters with the vehicle lines not the ground it sits on. Bottom of door is level I dont understand why some of you say it is not?
 

signbrad

Member
So which line would you use? Bottom is going off the rocker, top is the indented line in the door. I usually like to follow the rocker and the overall rake of the car. View attachment 154404
Long before vinyl graphics appeared, the bottom edge of the door was the accepted standard to measure from for lines of lettering. Since the bottom edge was usually somewhat parallel to the ground—though not always—measuring from the bottom of the door rendered the most pleasing visual. But sometimes not, even back in the 70s. This was true not just with lines of lettering, but when installing body side moldings, too.
In the above examples, the top line is parallel to the ground, but my eyes tell me it appears slightly lifted on the right. On the other hand, if you cover the entire bottom example with your hand, the top one seems to look fine.
If I'm running the shop, I would probably let either one go out the door, unless the client voiced an objection. They're always right, right?
If the quarter panel must have an additional line of copy, it should generally be on the same plane as the door lettering—not at an angle of its own. Or, put the secondary copy in a bouncy script and then it's a moot point.

My mentor always said, "If it looks right, it is right." Unless the client says it's wrong.

Brad in Kansas City
 

Notarealsignguy

Active Member
Long before vinyl graphics appeared, the bottom edge of the door was the accepted standard to measure from for lines of lettering. Since the bottom edge was usually somewhat parallel to the ground—though not always—measuring from the bottom of the door rendered the most pleasing visual. But sometimes not, even back in the 70s. This was true not just with lines of lettering, but when installing body side moldings, too.
In the above examples, the top line is parallel to the ground, but my eyes tell me it appears slightly lifted on the right. On the other hand, if you cover the entire bottom example with your hand, the top one seems to look fine.
If I'm running the shop, I would probably let either one go out the door, unless the client voiced an objection. They're always right, right?
If the quarter panel must have an additional line of copy, it should generally be on the same plane as the door lettering—not at an angle of its own. Or, put the secondary copy in a bouncy script and then it's a moot point.

My mentor always said, "If it looks right, it is right." Unless the client says it's wrong.

Brad in Kansas City
If the client says its crooked, tell them to tilt their head.
 
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