Matte or Gloss overlaminate for longevity

Texas_Signmaker

Very Active Signmaker
Few years ago I switch to mostly using matte overlam because I like the look of it better. I noticed a site-sign I did 2 years ago was dirty and moldy. Is gloss better for longevity or does it not matter?
 

WYLDGFI

Merchant Member
Our standard is glossy....we use it for a majority of our work. Luster is a nice option and matte for when a client requests it. It really doesn't matter for longevity except for the overall quality of the lam used.
 

JBurton

Signtologist
Satin all day, but for vehicles gloss. Satin from Arlon is basically matte, unlike luster from 3m that's basically gloss.
But yeah, for maximum 'clean' lifetime, gloss seems catches less dirt and rinses cleaner in the rain.
 

MntPrintHead

New Member
I used matte indoor and out because it doesn't have glare that can made a sign hard to read in the sun or on a show floor with track lighting pointed on it. I had been planning on switch to matte lam for big rig spoiler logos, but am now reconsidering hearing how it wears.
 

Texas_Signmaker

Very Active Signmaker
Well, today I drove by a sign I did in gloss and noticed it was starting to get moldy too. I guess some areas are prone to mold more than others. I really prefer matte over gloss now, it doesn't glare outdoors or indoors and doesn't look as cheap.
 
We use matte for everything (except vehicles) unless client requests otherwise. Matte just looks higher quality, and plus it doesn't have any glare on storefront signage.
Only exception is a place where we know it's likely to get scuffed by shoes or need a lot of cleaning, since we personally find the gloss cleans up better.
 

Texas_Signmaker

Very Active Signmaker
Most of them are in East Texas / NE Louisiana... it's a hot muggy swamp so I guess it's no surprise. I haven't noticed it on building signs, just site signs.
 

JBurton

Signtologist
Not that I know of. We just have a few vehicles we did in Austin, TX that is exhibiting mold and I'm trying to verify if it's an arlon issue or some other factor.
I hear a lot of folks throwing around the idea of mold as an issue with laminates, but I think this is just a sort of failure, totally don't know what, but I find it hard to believe that mold is growing between two mediums with sunlight all day long, and typically these failures are the worst on southern walls, mold doesn't like sunlight, so at the least you'd expect to see more mold on the north side.
I think it's either a UV inhibitor that is not doing it's job, causing the white point on the print media to take a premature nosedive. I think it's been coming up on multiple vendors stuff as well.
 

Texas_Signmaker

Very Active Signmaker
It's not growing in between the two materials... it's on the surface. It can be cleaned away... this sign is just under 2 years old. Most signs don't look this bad after such a short time and I was thinking if it was because of the matte.

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