Recommended Router Bits

visionsigns

New Member
We just purchased a ShopBot CNC router and would like to know what brand and where you suggest purchasing router bits.

As we are starting off, what type of bits do you recommend that we keep on hand? We'll be cutting mainly plastic materials, but occasionally aluminum composite.

Thanks!
 

SignRover

New Member
1/4" Onsrud spiral upcut bits are great for plastics, foam, hdu and light aluminum. We run them on our bots all day long.
 

visionsigns

New Member
Wow Onsrud has a lot to choose from. Do you suggest Single or Double Edge, and what CED and CEL? I believe we will be cutting mainly acrylic and pvc.

I had no idea there would be so many options. How many bits would you say that you can't live without..or do you use primarily one for everything?
 

visionsigns

New Member
In another post, someone mentioned they recommend using a downcut when they apply a sheet of vinyl to acrylic prior to cutting. What factors do you consider in upcut vs downcut?

What's the difference in the Sprial O and Super O? Have you tried the Super O?
 

seattle

New Member
We use SGS.

As far as upcut/downcut. It makes since that when you have vinyl on the top of your subsrtae you would want the force down in stead up up, because up will lift the edge of the vinyl.

Hey Blueridge, nice signs you make there.!
 

Speeddm

New Member
I use Belin bits. Never have I found anything that cuts cleaner. Gator board to 6061 even 5051 al. They work really well
 

ClaytonT

New Member
From all of the common suppliers, I've found micro 100 to be the best, followed by onsrud. Most of my cutting is with aluminum and acrylic.
 

SebastienL

New Member
CED = cutter edge diameter
CEL = cutter edge lenght

If youre gonna cut plywood, you need a compression bit. It's like a combined up/downcut.

Upcut "lift" the chip up so it can leave a ragged edge. Downcut pushes the chip down so it leaves a cleaner edge.

I think you'll find that it's not the brand of the bit that matters as much as "the mileage" of the bit that matters most as far as finnish quality. A new bit leave a better finish than an old one.

Single edge is better.
 

SebastienL

New Member
Keep in mind that "the bit" is not the only factor in finish quality: cutting speed, rpm and how you set-up your tool all play a big part!!!
 

rdm01

New Member
Also keep in mind that the last time someone was on this thread was almost a
year ago, so their question was most likely answered already. :ROFLMAO:
 

johnnysigns

New Member
We're using Onsrud and some Amana tooling. Apples to apples, we've found the Onsrud bits to last much, much longer than Amana tools. We're playing close attention to chipload/feed rates/RPM and cut quality.
 

WYLDGFI

Merchant Member
I use Belin bits. Never have I found anything that cuts cleaner. Gator board to 6061 even 5051 al. They work really well
We started using Belin Bits for aluminum and Composites....nice clean cut and they seem to last. Have had too many issues with the bits directly from Colex lately.
 

Jester1167

Premium Subscriber
I found that down-cutting bits don't work well with plastics or plastic cored materials. Down-cutting bits tend to melt the plastics and adhesive from the prints leaving lots of edge cleanup. When we had prints laminated to PVC or ACM we would get good results by masking the graphic and using an up-cut bit.
 

MikePro

Member
Onsrud, Belin, & Armana have been great brands for me. Carbide Spiral O Upcut bits are worth the cost over plain steel bits, as they will last much longer & cut wonderfully.

downcut bits aren't that great unless you've machined a "valley" around the perimeter of the shape you're downcutting else, as stated above, the material gets slammed-down into itself as its cutting and melts back into the sheet/shape...even worse with aluminum, and risks breaking the bit due to heat nomatter the material.
 

JBurton

Signtologist
Belin all day here. I have some armana designed for folding acm as well.
I find downcut bits work fine on something as thin as 3mm acm. Just Friday I ran a set of 10 panels with printed graphics stuck to the sheet. There was a good deal of packed acm core/rubber/plastic whatever the hell that mystery material is, but it was all packed into the drop side. Panels popped out nicely.
Finally ran my router as fast as I could on some 1/8" the other day too. Good god the rooster tail a 1/4" bit will throw while running 120 ipm in a single pass. Though it needs parts to be over a square foot or they like to go flying.
Still trying to find a v-bit that will hold up on some aluminum if anybody has suggestions there.
 

SignEST

New Member
Belin all day here. I have some armana designed for folding acm as well.
I find downcut bits work fine on something as thin as 3mm acm. Just Friday I ran a set of 10 panels with printed graphics stuck to the sheet. There was a good deal of packed acm core/rubber/plastic whatever the hell that mystery material is, but it was all packed into the drop side. Panels popped out nicely.
Finally ran my router as fast as I could on some 1/8" the other day too. Good god the rooster tail a 1/4" bit will throw while running 120 ipm in a single pass. Though it needs parts to be over a square foot or they like to go flying.
Still trying to find a v-bit that will hold up on some aluminum if anybody has suggestions there.
I've failed engraving with one but onsrud makes v-mills that work pretty decent for side cutting. Given you hog away most of the material first with a straight flute and don't use the v-mill to plunge. It's really bad for the spindle if you take too hard of a pass but I'm sure you already know that. Make sure to use ample coolant/lubricant.


It's not recommended but it works with the correct feeds/speeds.


For engraving with a vmill they say using some sort of a spring loaded bit works great. Never had much luck with one but it's more than likely operator error.

 
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