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RIP Computer

dfelty

New Member
Anyone on here both Tech Savvy and running a print shop on a daily basis? I have a question about building a RIP Computer. I have some basic knowledge on building the PC and have built several for around the shop. I've always used one of my original office computers as a RIP station for the past 10 years. Well we had a power outage which caused damage to the hard drive and now we are looking at building a new one. My question is, what have you found works best in the RIP environment?

I know design software is built to run better on specific CPUs with a certain number of cores and then M.2 vs SATA for storage. I'm having trouble finding info on what works best for RIP software. At this point, we will primarily be running Versaworks 6 as well as Versaworks 5 for our older printer that is not compatible with Versaworks 6. Also interested in how much memory is necessary for Ripping? I want to build something that won't constantly be lagging on Ripping jobs but also isn't incredibly overbuilt for our needs. This PC will be a stand alone RIP station with only minimal design software usage for minor changes at the station. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

myront

CorelDRAW is best
Can't give much advice on specific pc configuration for a RIP station but it doesn't have to be as robust as a design workstation. I find that more and more what slows print jobs from ripping is on the designers. All vector files should be ripped as pdf and the settings can be set up to make very small file sizes. If a file is all raster my general rule is if the physical dimensions are larger than 20" save as 150dpi tif using LZW compression. Smaller prints can be sent at a higher resolution if the images support it. The RIP is only slow if printing huge files. No file should be more than 150MB.
 

rjssigns

Active Member
I have an older build with an AMD Black Series CPU, 8G's RAM with an SSD for main and HDD for backup. I use Flexi for design/RIP and it has no problem printing wrap files.
System was a custom build by a local shop. They interviewed me as to needs then optimized based on those needs.
SSD for your main drive is a must IMO.
 

MikePatterson

Head bathroom cleaner.
We run a Dell Precision T3600 Xeon E5-2670 processor with 64gig RAM and 1tb SSD. Video card doesn't have to be much. RIP is CPU and RAM intensive.
We drive 3 printers and 2 cutters through Flexi, VW5, and VW6 all at the same time. No lagging other than normal RIP times.

This unit is an older but still runs right along.
 

Notarealsignguy

Arial - it's almost helvetica
RIP.png
 

Geneva Olson

Expert Storyteller
I just make sure it can handle flexi and has enough memory. I'm not going for extra bells and whistles if all i'm doing is using it to drive my printer.
 

Solventinkjet

DIY Printer Fixing Guide
If you're running one printer off of it, cores don't matter as much as clock speed. If you need to RIP multiple files at once, more cores can help. I wouldn't go less than 16gb of ram and an M.2 drive will help as well.
 

Pauly

Complete Graphics
Here's some basic specs you can follow:

Minimum specs:
6core/12 thread AMD or Intel CPU. (AMD 5600x or Intel 12600K)
16gb RAM
1tb m.2 (or more)
Optional GPU Nvidia RTX3050 or AMD rx6600 or anything around that price.

Higher spec:
8 core / 16 thread AMD or Intel (AMD 5800x or intel 12700K)
32GB RAM
2x 1tb m.2 (or more) (one as boot and software drive, other as storage)
Optional GPU Nvidia RTX3050 or AMD rx6600 or anything around that price.
 

balstestrat

Problem Solver
Just for some versaworks, even if two versions I say almost any setup from couple years back will work just fine. You don't need much for it.
Drop an SSD in it and do a fresh install and you are good.

People even run Caldera happily on these "laptop" boxes. It's all good as long as you don't deal with hundreds of large files daily and have multiple printers to deal with at the same time. SSD makes a big big difference compared to HDDs.

1651297673677.png
 

CanuckSigns

Active Member
Don't over think it, a desktop with a minimum i7 processor and 16gb of ram and a.ssd will be more than enough for your needs unless you are ripping hundreds of files a day.
 

garyroy

New Member
We have 4 computers we bought SignBurst. The guy's name is Casey. He builds systems just for Sign Makers.
2 of them are from almost 8 years ago and they run perfectly.
We just bought a new one with a lot of power and plan on retiring 1 of the older ones when it gets to the failing point.
They come with lifetime support so anytime you need to call him with a question or problem, he's there to help.
He is also VERY big on backup NAS drives. You have to have your system backed up for occurrences like the one you had.

When I bought the new computer, he logged on remotely to my network and transferred all my important stuff onto the new computer.
Transferred all fonts, old emails, etc. to the new computer. (I don't know how to do that stuff) :eek: He spent about 2 hours doing it.
He also preinstalled LibreOffice and some other programs when he built it. He concentrates on eradicating bloatware so the system arrives clean.

The computers are not cheap but his support has been invaluable to me, I'm a computer illiterate.
He's worth talking to, Just a suggestion.
 

karst41

New Member
Anyone on here both Tech Savvy and running a print shop on a daily basis? I have a question about building a RIP Computer. I have some basic knowledge on building the PC and have built several for around the shop. I've always used one of my original office computers as a RIP station for the past 10 years. Well we had a power outage which caused damage to the hard drive and now we are looking at building a new one. My question is, what have you found works best in the RIP environment?

I know design software is built to run better on specific CPUs with a certain number of cores and then M.2 vs SATA for storage. I'm having trouble finding info on what works best for RIP software. At this point, we will primarily be running Versaworks 6 as well as Versaworks 5 for our older printer that is not compatible with Versaworks 6. Also interested in how much memory is necessary for Ripping? I want to build something that won't constantly be lagging on Ripping jobs but also isn't incredibly overbuilt for our needs. This PC will be a stand alone RIP station with only minimal design software usage for minor changes at the station. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
No He II no.. dont blow money on building a flippin PC. That is very wastefull.

I have an HP Elite Desk SFF these are cheap and perfectly fine for a RIP Computer.
It uses the DP video connector. Buy a DP (Display Port) cable The Samsungs dont come with

My experience with computers started in the Late 70's (Trash 80's) and I Have degree in it too.

You need to place money in the RAM,,,,,Max it out, Your HDD's need to be SSD,,, boy oh boy they arefkn Lightning FAST!

Get the Samsung 590 series 27" Monitors. I have a 590 with a curved screen that Rocks,,,,,Dont get a Gaming Monitor.
They are totally Wrong for your application. Get the Logitech MX Keyboard. they cost about $130.
Absolute beast of a keyboard. Get the PC version. They Make a Mac version too.

There all done and you just saved a crapton of money and your monitor just synched up perfectly with Windows thanks to the little HP puter.
The photo is a i7. I absolutely Love it as much as I do my Macs

If you Go Mac. The Mac Mini M1 is KILLER Get the 2tb ssd drive option.
Otherwise you will get a Satechi add on base and put a 2tg stick in the base. Killer with the Samsung Monitors


Finally: I prefer the little Logitech $20 Mouse over and above Apples Magic Mouse 2. Im old and stoggy so there.
 

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karst41

New Member
Just for some versaworks, even if two versions I say almost any setup from couple years back will work just fine. You don't need much for it.
Drop an SSD in it and do a fresh install and you are good.

People even run Caldera happily on these "laptop" boxes. It's all good as long as you don't deal with hundreds of large files daily and have multiple printers to deal with at the same time. SSD makes a big big difference compared to HDDs.

View attachment 159232
Yep Has the USB 3 (blue) I was even thinking about getting one of the little ones that mount on the back of the monitor.
I use Flexi Subscript and the SFF will run any of the Rips. I have one file that has a a massive amount of gradient fills,
and it takes forever to rip. It is a huuuuge file from the client. Its the on;ly fill that has issues Mac or PC what I call hateful.
 

netsol

Premium Subscriber
Karst41,
I am a little skeptical anout the micro form factor if that's what you mean
No options to upgrade, no expansion slots.
If the rip is actually workingbhard, no air flow to cool the cpu, ram, ssd & those sub minature capacitors (the compnent that normally goes bad when you haveva mother board failure)

Also, ram is either SOLDERED IN, or there are 2 slots and almost no option to increase, ALL THE DISADVANTAGES of a notebook/laptop and none of the advantages
 

ikarasu

Active Member
Check the rip specs and see what the recommended is, and go above that.

Clock speed, ran (fast ram) and a SSD will speed things up above that. If you're ripping off a network to an SSD it isn't going to help much though ..

I run a 5950x at home, 64 GB of RAM and it takes me half as long to rip a dozen files at home than it does at work on mid tier (built a year ago) PC. And it never bogs down due to all the ram / cores.

That said, you don't need to spend 2k on a PC to have it max out the rips performance... Especially when (at least with onyx) you're limited to a few cores unless you pay for more. Which, imo isn't worth it unless you're ripping for 5 printers.


I recommend looking at what versaworks recommends and then beating it for future proofness.
 

karst41

New Member
Karst41,
I am a little skeptical anout the micro form factor if that's what you mean
No options to upgrade, no expansion slots.
If the rip is actually workingbhard, no air flow to cool the cpu, ram, ssd & those sub minature capacitors (the compnent that normally goes bad when you haveva mother board failure)

Also, ram is either SOLDERED IN, or there are 2 slots and almost no option to increase, ALL THE DISADVANTAGES of a notebook/laptop and none of the advantages
preciate the intelk on the micro.

The SFF i7 Ive been using 5 or 6 years now and not one issue at all When I bought it I bought the ram upgrade.
But I have yet to install a SSD in it and temped to buy another one to run Graphtec Studio Pro to drive two 8600-75's
Not real happy with SAI new Mac Version and is a bit much for a pair of vinyl plotters.
But SAI for the Print Rip and contour cut on the 8600- 160 will remain in place.
 
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