4'x6' For Sale Sign

Stacey K

I like making signs
Hi I have an order for a 4'x6' "For Sale" sign. They would like it installed with 4x4 posts. I was thinking of using 1/2" MDO with aluminum sign screwed to it and then 2 posts in the ground (as suggested by customer). I would assume I should put them 3-4' in the ground without cement. In WI. Do I need to do anything with the MDO to seal it? Do I need 2x4's behind on top and bottom for a brace? Thanks!
 

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CanuckSigns

Active Member
I would either make the sign from 6mm ACM and have a few 2x4's behind for added support, or just use 1/2" MDO as your sign board and apply vinyl to it. For sealing, depending on how long the sign is needed for, you can either just put some outdoor latex paint on the edges for short term (under a year) or you can use a waterproof caulking on the edges for more long term,.

Use the ACM, less work and a better end product.
 

aerial

QCB
This is how we do it...We use 4x4 pressure treated posts and Alumalite. We cut a slot in the posts a little wider than the alumalite. We dig the holes deep enough to get below the frost line, (about 3 feet) slide in the pole, and get it plumb. Fill in and tamp tamp tamp. We don't use concrete for temporary signs. On site we screw a 2x4 (also slotted) to the bottom for support. Then slide in the sign from the top, and screw on another slotted 2 x4 across the top. This way you can have a double sided sign with one board. If the sign is temporary they may ask you to remove it later. Just unscrew and pull the posts.

There are post and panel kits you can buy, but usually the customer is OK with unpainted pressure treated for a temporary sign.
 

chester215

Just call me Chester.
6mm ACM, I would use washers on the mounting screws. I do not think any braces are needed (can't hurt i guess).
If you want to get fancy you can color the fender washers the same color as the sign so they blend in.
3-4 ft in the ground seems pretty deep to me. 2-3 should work especially if the ground is rocky, a post hole digger will only go so deep.
Better hurry up and seal the deal before the ground freezes.
 

Johnny Best

Very Active Member
I agree with Notarealsignguy with ACM or Alumacore. But if you have to seal the edges of MDO there have been countless ideas on this from carpenter glue, epoxy, waterproof caulk, and finish off with two coats of latex paint. But MDO does not hold up as it use to and sealing the edges is labor intensive and not worth the trouble of extra material cost when a 6mm ACM panel will do a better job.
A pt 2x4 horizontal stringer on the back to attach panel is not a bad idea.
 

JBurton

Signtologist
If they want it to look like your drawing (panel floating past posts), I'd opt for MDO, and just wrap the print over the edges!
ACM will need horizontal supports, but would work fine until the mower clips it.
 

Gino

Premium Subscriber
With MDO, you'll have some extra time in prepping it, but it is a temporary sign. Sooo.......

You buy a pre-painted sheet, cut it 3" wider then you need (75") and use some decent wood putty on the top & bottom, as the sides will be buried in the posts. Use your thumb to put it in the voids and cracks. This'll take about 10 minutes. Give it a coat of top coat paint. About an hour later, give it another coat. That hour in between, rout out your two posts each 1.5" deep. Might take 2 passes. Depends on your router. So, In an hour, your posts are done and so is your panel. Now, letter just as you would anything else.

Assemble your sign on the ground (put some cardboard down first) Dig holes directly where the posts ends are and go about 38" deep or 12" below your frostline. Ours is around 24" around here. Once the holes are in, set the sign up and into the holes and like mentioned.... tamp, tamp, tamp until it's firmly in place. No need for cross braces, expensive ACM or anything else. Do not frame the top & bottom.
 

Z SIGNS

Member
Here is what we do.
It is nice looking, easier to build and much cheaper to make and install.(acm cost less than MDO)
Mdo and wood posts are a thing of the past.
 

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Gino

Premium Subscriber
Yeah nobody said a lotta things, as they weren't asked. Like obtaining permits. Engineer drawings. Insurance. Stamped or not.

I would imagine, since it was only the sign substrates involved the other stuff is just understood.​
 

ikarasu

Active Member
You guys need permits / engineer drawings, etc for stuff like this? All temp or real estate signs pretty much are exempt for us (a few rules... Like no billboard sized signs, etc)

Up here we can just grab a few two by fours and pound them into the ground and we're good to go. That being said on a windy day I enjoy seeing half the signs knocked over because they weren't installed properly.... Wish there was a bit more regulation!


I'm also surprised to see no one mentioned 10 Mil Coro. That seems to be the go to for temp 4x8 real estate signs around here... No one wants to pay the price of plywood.
 

Notarealsignguy

Active Member
I'm surprised how many use concrete. Fill the hole with gravel and use a tamping rod. It will stay there forever and is much easier to remove when time comes.
 

Gino

Premium Subscriber
That might work in warmer climates, but up here where the ground freezes, thaws, winds, gets washed out by rains and whatnot..... the ground is constantly shifting, causing the sign posts to move. In my neck of the woods, there are so many rocks, they keep coming to the surface and with them it will knock things over which are not securely installed.
 

Stacey K

I like making signs
LOL, I called diggers hotline yesterday and I don't need a permit for this temp sign per the city. It's going on an empty lot so the realtor will meet me there to go over the exact location. I have a post hole digger and my son will be doing the digging as he put up a fence with over 200 posts and just helped his dad put up a pole shed so I'm pretty confident we can figure out the 2 holes. I also have business insurance. Just want to make sure the sign part of it is correct. As far as concrete, I may just ask the realtor if he prefers I use it or not. He usually installs them himself but he's buy and getting old he told me lol
 

Stacey K

I like making signs
One more question on this. If I go 3' down and the sign is 4' tall and close to the sidewalk, should I make the posts 10' tall? This makes it 7' tall total.
 

JBurton

Signtologist
One more question on this. If I go 3' down and the sign is 4' tall and close to the sidewalk, should I make the posts 10' tall? This makes it 7' tall total.
If you want it that tall, then yes.
Or are you asking what a suitable height is?
 

Geneva Olson

Expert Storyteller
I would either make the sign from 6mm ACM and have a few 2x4's behind for added support, or just use 1/2" MDO as your sign board and apply vinyl to it. For sealing, depending on how long the sign is needed for, you can either just put some outdoor latex paint on the edges for short term (under a year) or you can use a waterproof caulking on the edges for more long term,.

Use the ACM, less work and a better end product.
On the back the if the 2x4s are in an "X" shape, that would give it the support it needs.
 
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