canvas prints scuff easily - help!

kkamauu

New Member
We are printing high quality canvas prints using our solvent JV33 Mimaki.

We are using SS21 inks.

The prints look flawless, yet while we stretch them onto bars or even as we are handling them with care we still get scuff marks. We have left them out for a couple days to let them dry but doesn't change.

I was told to liquid laminate them. is that the only way or...

1. try a different type of ink
2. spray (the spray works but very expensive)
other ideas?

thanks,
Kahea
 

bob

Member
Do not use frog juice. For anything. Especially anything with solvent inks.

Use Clear Shield. Original formula in either satin or gloss, your choice.

Moreover, when working with the canvas prints always do so on a soft clean surface. I have a couple of old blankets that I spread on the table top and do all of the stretching and any other work on top of the blanket. If you slide a canvas print around on a normal table or a cutting mat I guarantee you that you'll have abrasions.

Think about it, the media is textured and just the high points in that texture rub on flat table surface. Worse with a cutting mat which is slightly abrasive. The actual bearing surface area is minute thus the pressure on these surfaces is more than sufficient to grind off the ink.

Even if you do everything right, if you're doing a gallery wrap you still have to be very careful of the corners and edges. It doesn't take much to scratch the ink off a corner or an edge. I keep a huge array of sharpies just to touch up any minor zits.
 

MikePro

Member
maybe try using an old pillowcase for handling the media during stretching.?

or maybe even a foam roller and 100% silicone? I've always wanted to try that if I got into canvas printing... could give the finished product a cool, scratch-proof, textured finish.

i print wallpaper murals and i go out of my way to avoid dragging that textured print across my tabletop and even use a wet sponge to moisten the surface before i use my bristle-brush squeegee for application.
 

bob

Member
Care to share why you say that?

One does not coat solvent based pigments with a solvent based coating. I have a small sheet of eco-solvent printed decals that, for an experiment, I tried coating with frog juice. It took well over a year for the coating to dry.

Use a water based clear coat on solvent prints. And vice versa. Always. Sometimes you can get away with using frog juice but that's all you're doing; getting away with it.

The best, and perhaps only use, I've ever found for frog juice is coating MDF board so that vinyl will stick to it. Even at that, there's far more economical solutions.
 

DHUGS

New Member
One does not coat solvent based pigments with a solvent based coating. I have a small sheet of eco-solvent printed decals that, for an experiment, I tried coating with frog juice. It took well over a year for the coating to dry.

Use a water based clear coat on solvent prints. And vice versa. Always. Sometimes you can get away with using frog juice but that's all you're doing; getting away with it.

The best, and perhaps only use, I've ever found for frog juice is coating MDF board so that vinyl will stick to it. Even at that, there's far more economical solutions.

This does not make sense. Frog Juice works fine with solvent prints. What was your base media? For water based applications use water based Frog Juice.
 
J

john1

Guest
I used Clear Shield Original last year on some 2x8' prints and you want to use water based liquid laminate on solvent inks.
 
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