Suggestions Don't want to mess up the furniture

Lindsey

Not A New Member
I've got a reception sign to install tomorrow. There are built in counters/cupboards, about 28"-32" deep, attached to the wall. I'm going to have to stand on top of the counter to get the install done. It's a fancy place, and I don't want to mess up their nice countertop, or give the impression that I'm trampling on their fancy furniture with my dusty work boots.

What would you use to protect the countertop? I was thinking a big piece of cardboard would do the trick, but am worried that it might be a slip hazard for me. I feel like a drop cloth or tarp would be too slippery and would bunch up. I thought about wearing those cotton "booties" over my boots, but that also seems like it would be slippery for me.

Any suggestions?
 

Moze

Precision Sign Services
If it's a nice place, I dress nicer. My customers (the sign company I'm installing for) appreciate it and the end customers (where I'm installing) appreciate it. So, not being sarcastic here, but maybe don't wear "dusty work boots". I have never covered a counter I have to stand on, for the very reason you mentioned - it's a slip hazard.

Do your install, then clean the counter off so that it's cleaner than when you got there.
 

rjssigns

Active Member
To stand on I would use one of the cheap carpet runners from Costco. Walmart probably has them too. They're about 9 bucks and have a super grippy rubber on the bottom.
I use them on my office floor and in our living room so my 91 pound pup doesn't skid on the floor. Works a treat and once they're in place they aren't going anywhere.

And I agree with Precision, go in neat and clean with logo'ed apparel. Look sharp, feel sharp, be sharp because you never know who's watching.
 

Lindsey

Not A New Member
To stand on I would use one of the cheap carpet runners from Costco. Walmart probably has them too. They're about 9 bucks and have a super grippy rubber on the bottom.
I use them on my office floor and in our living room so my 91 pound pup doesn't skid on the floor. Works a treat and once they're in place they aren't going anywhere.

And I agree with Precision, go in neat and clean with logo'ed apparel. Look sharp, feel sharp, be sharp because you never know who's watching.

Thank you rjssigns. The carpet runner is a good idea. I'll try it.
 

CanuckSigns

Active Member
I agree, don;t wear your work boots, put on some clean shoes, do your work and clean the counter after you are done.
 

Lindsey

Not A New Member
If it's a nice place, I dress nicer. My customers (the sign company I'm installing for) appreciate it and the end customers (where I'm installing) appreciate it. So, not being sarcastic here, but maybe don't wear "dusty work boots". I have never covered a counter I have to stand on, for the very reason you mentioned - it's a slip hazard.

Do your install, then clean the counter off so that it's cleaner than when you got there.

I get where you are coming from, but my safety boots are non-negotiable. There's no way I'm showing up in sneakers, loafers, or any other type of footwear just to impress the office staff.

Sometimes for installs I purposely do the opposite of dressing up. As a young-ish woman, there are times when I feel that some clients doubt whether I have the skills or know how to use a drill, a level, or basic tools. I feel that wearing my work denims, toolbelt, and getting some drywall dust on my comfy t-shirt signals that it's not my first time out.

I save the dressing up for sales meetings.
 

Notarealsignguy

Active Member
If you dress too nice they're gonna think you're over charging them. Go in like a slob, do a good job and they will feel like they got a deal. If you really play your cards right, they will feel sorry for you and give you a bunch more work.
edit: I wrote this before your reply..... haha Im not saying youre a slob!
 
I've seen people of both sexes dressed to fool people. It doesn't work. I also don't think it matters if you're Irish, Chinese, Swahili or any other nationality, man or woman. You're not out to prove anything to anybody. Do your job and get paid. If they liked you it will be for real reasons and you might get asked back.
 

d fleming

Member
Dress nice but safe, put non slip carpet runner down if you absolutely have to stand on counter. I was always taught to put your best foot forward when in front of a customer. Brush your hair, check your breath, fresh shave, etc. Shows and gets respect. I would never go to an install dressed like a slob. To me it gives the impression that you do sloppy work as well. But I'm old school and still hold open doors for people so there, lol.
 

JBurton

Signtologist
it's cleaner than when you got there.
So much this. Gotta love backing up to take a picture of bank door vinyl, and all of the other windows and doors look like they were washed by a 5 year old with a dirty rag.
All this reminds me of the time I pushed a 20lbs rock out of a wall with a hammer drill, that fell through the drop ceiling and landed on a worker's desk. Fortunately it was around midnight, so nobody was there.
 

Notarealsignguy

Active Member
So much this. Gotta love backing up to take a picture of bank door vinyl, and all of the other windows and doors look like they were washed by a 5 year old with a dirty rag.
All this reminds me of the time I pushed a 20lbs rock out of a wall with a hammer drill, that fell through the drop ceiling and landed on a worker's desk. Fortunately it was around midnight, so nobody was there.
At least it was a drop ceiling. My friends an electrician and his dumbass helper pokes his foot through ceilings during attic work on a fairly regular basis. Try to match that repair. The remedy is you go in the attic yourself but what's worse?
 

Texas_Signmaker

Very Active Signmaker
I don't think I could reach the pedals of my truck in sneakers... I always wear my work uniform of Carhartt and steel toe boots. I'm there to preform installation work and not to look like office staff.
 

Notarealsignguy

Active Member
I don't think I could reach the pedals of my truck in sneakers... I always wear my work uniform of Carhartt and steel toe boots. I'm there to preform installation work and not to look like office staff.
Is that why you wear high heels? I always thought it was because you were weird. Must suck having to sit on the phone book to see over the wheel.
 

netsol

Member
So much this. Gotta love backing up to take a picture of bank door vinyl, and all of the other windows and doors look like they were washed by a 5 year old with a dirty rag.
All this reminds me of the time I pushed a 20lbs rock out of a wall with a hammer drill, that fell through the drop ceiling and landed on a worker's desk. Fortunately it was around midnight, so nobody was there.
Jburton, back in the mid 1970's I lost a big install ( wiring, long before the sign industry was on my mind) job to a local competitor who managed a fairly large company. It seemed like a catastrophe, until the ceiling collapsed and his crew ended up on a (occupied) conference table, interrupting a board meeting. The law suits went on for years. Very lucky I lost that job
 

mim

New Member
I have used scrap pieces of cutting mat on installs since it doesn't slip as much as cardboard
 

JBurton

Signtologist
At least it was a drop ceiling. My friends an electrician and his dumbass helper pokes his foot through ceilings during attic work on a fairly regular basis. Try to match that repair. The remedy is you go in the attic yourself but what's worse?
I don't know about that. My brother in-law decided he would 'help' the direct tv dude in the attic at my sister's house. Guess who's foot ended up above the kitchen sink...

Jburton, back in the mid 1970's I lost a big install ( wiring, long before the sign industry was on my mind) job to a local competitor who managed a fairly large company. It seemed like a catastrophe, until the ceiling collapsed and his crew ended up on a (occupied) conference table, interrupting a board meeting. The law suits went on for years. Very lucky I lost that job
Oh to be a fly on that wall. This sounds about as bad as the company I heard from that stepped on a plastic sprinkler line in the attic of some big hotel, twice in one year!
 

Gino

Premium Subscriber
This isn't sign related, but the incident kinda is along these same lines.

My wedding date was fast approaching and we were having work done at my house, before the wedding so it would be ready for when we got hitched. The plumber was enlarging our second floor bathroom and moving things around. He told us time after time to be careful, cause the floor was completely removed to move pipes and such and only the rafters were there. One day, he said c'mon up here and look at how far we got. He said, stay back, I know where everything is. So as he's balancing on the rafter, he reached for the light string and slipped off the rafter and right through the ceiling below, which was our dining room on the first floor. I ran downstairs to see my Dad staring at these two legs that fell out the ceiling and just flailing around. My wife to be was in the next room looking in disbelief at it, too. Bad part is, the house was old and all the walls and ceilings were all lath work and these buggers broke and went right up his crotch and butt. He got a little torn up, but nothing serious. Looked like something out of a 3 Stooges movie.
 
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