Installing full coverage vinyl

soloinstaller

New Member
Hey guys, what do you think about applying white color cast vinyl (non-perforated) with a grey adhesive to fully cover a back window of a truck? Would there be risk of breakage if its white? Black cast lettering would be layered ontop of the white base layer. Customer is looking to block out sunlight and headlights from vehicles
 

rjssigns

Active Member
I don't see an issue with breakage. If you have the capability just print/lam/cut/install.

Odd request since your client will get glare from the side mirrors.

Laws are different in different places. In my neck of the woods anything from the drivers shoulder back can be blocked out.
 

White Haus

Newbie
Hey guys, what do you think about applying white color cast vinyl (non-perforated) with a grey adhesive to fully cover a back window of a truck? Would there be risk of breakage if its white? Black cast lettering would be layered ontop of the white base layer. Customer is looking to block out sunlight and headlights from vehicles

Shouldn't be any issues with doing that. Let me know if you would like us to have a look at printing it for you, we're running 3M IJ180cv3 every other day in the shop.

Good luck with your project!
 

bcxprint420

Sign & Banner Xpress
Hey guys, what do you think about applying white color cast vinyl (non-perforated) with a grey adhesive to fully cover a back window of a truck? Would there be risk of breakage if its white? Black cast lettering would be layered ontop of the white base layer. Customer is looking to block out sunlight and headlights from vehicles
Illegal cant block rear view hence use a one way film.
 

netsol

New Member
Just because there is no law about it doesnt mean its not dangerous. Might consider liability if they crash i guarantee you they will come knocking at your door.
however, it is no different than a box truck or my econoline (before i put the backup camera in)
 

Gino

Premium Subscriber
How it was explained to me was........ rear windows in doors or a rear windshield cannot be blocked by anything possibly blocking your vision from turning your head or rear view mirror. Side windows have the same treatment. Back around the early 90s it was also to protect police officers from not being able to see inside approaching suspects.

If a vehicle came through from the factory with rear view mirrors, perf was the only thing you could use. You cannot compare an enclosed box truck to another vehicle. Either read the laws on the books and stop guessing, or contact your local state Police inspection head and get it in writing.
 

Notarealsignguy

Arial is the only font you need
We just went through this on an oddball van from a fleet that had back windows where the rest did not which made the layouts not match. The customer and I agreed that if we blocked it out (which I am pretty sure is 100% legal in Florida) and there was any sort of accident, this would be the thing an attorney would jump all over in a civil suit since it came with rear windows from the factory. Commercial vehicles and large companies are a big fat target for litigation. I do not think perf is a good thing to put on vehicle windows either but I generally hate window perf to begin with. It's tacky, especially on storefronts.
 

Boudica

I'm here for educational purposes.
As long as the vehicle has proper side mirrors... it's legal. Here any way.
We do it all the time. I ask them, do you need to see out the rear window? If yes, then perf. No, cover it. Often times, there are windows, but they they have equipment outfitted, and they can't see out the back anyway. Could be a commercial vehicle thing?
But, When a truck has a camper on it, the back window is covered. So...?
Again, appropriate mirrors (or nowdays cameras).
 
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