Fixed mounting on overhead curved iron

gnubler

New Member
Any suggestions on how to mount a sign to curved iron like this? As you can see the current sign has gotten beat to sh!t, the customer does not want another swinging sign. My mockup for the new sign is a routed oval shape so it can be raised higher, probably 1/2" thick MDO (signboard). What kind of hardware would you suggest?

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JBurton

Signtologist
What's the profile of that rail? It's hard to say, but it looks like a curved piece of angle? Or two mounted opposite one another.
Weld up a bracket to mate to it, through bolt the bracket to the rail, have the bracket mounted to a frame, mount to either side of the frame. Or, since this looks like a foam sign, fab the new one from two MDO faces on a frame, hang it. More weight should prevent it from swinging up and getting beat up. Just be sure to replace almost all of that hardware, open S hooks should not be used to overhead securing, ideally just buy shackles and tie wire to tie the pin into the shackle. Even the eye bolts are unacceptable with the folded over eye, and evidently there is a reason they are using 3 different sized washers...
 

gnubler

New Member
Here's another shot with it lightened a bit, makes it easier to see. I haven't been able to make it over there with a ladder yet to see how the threaded hooks are mounted into the railing, but wasn't planning on using the existing hardware at all.

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signbrad

New Member
There is nothing wrong with a hanging sign that swings. But you absolutely must not allow it to move sideways very much or it will beat itself up and even fall.
The problem is the chains—they are too long. The ideal is one link between eyebolts. This minimizes side motion. Or, another way is to use turnbuckles (that have closed eyes) between the two eye bolts. This allows leveling of the sign. The turnbuckle should be screwed in short or you will have the same problem as with chains. Also, S-hooks should always be completely closed, or use small clevis shackles. At the bracket you could even use swing set hardware bolted to the bracket, attaching the turn buckle directly to the swing set hardware, and then a clevis between the turn buckle and the sign's eye bolt. Use a clevis that can be locked with a cotter pin or a spring clip. A spring clip is like an industrial "bobby pin."

You can make the hanging sign rigid, but you must make sure your bracket is firmly anchored to the wall, otherwise wind movement can work loose the bracket where it attaches to the wall. Making the attachment rigid may also be a lot more complicated than it is worth.

I attach swinging signs all the time, but never with chains. Just a link, making sure the sure side movement is restricted.

Brad in Kansas City
 

gnubler

New Member
Thank you for an informative post, Brad. Some options to consider.

JB - would a bracket like this work? Running a threaded rod from the bracket up into the railing and bolting it in.

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Billct2

Active Member
I agree with Brad, nothing wrong with swinging signs, but they need to have some weight and little to no chain. If they need some length I use a solid steel strap instead of chain. You could bolt a sign hanger thru the straight bottom piece, and thru the mdo and use steel strap to connect. If they want to spend more then a fabricated frame with fixed mounting to the steel would be great, but way more money.
 

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rjssigns

Active Member
To keep movement down run a "stay" to the building. This will allow movement in a controlled manner. Run it from the bottom corner closest to the building. Cable works great since it's so thin.
 

JBurton

Signtologist
Really need to know the profile of that part before hunting down brackets. If it's a square tube, that would likely work.
Another way to extend the length without using chain, use a solid length of all thread and some 1" EMT with the inserts (https://elgenmfg.com/conduit-inserts/ez-conduit-locks-1-2-100-pack-eg0970-c) to act like a giant bolt with threads on both ends for through bolting. The EMT will take the flex out of the allthread, the allthread will hold all the weight. Do not use to pieces of allthread at either end, one continuous length is required.
 

gnubler

New Member
Thanks all for the ideas, I appreciate it! Looking into this today, I'll let you know what route I decide to take.
 
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