Hand Lettered based on a font?

Colin

Member
This was obviously hand-lettered by a sign painter, but is it based on an actual font?
 

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Jillbeans

New Member
If you smashed LHF Hensler it may work.
Reminded me of FHA Signpainter's De Vinne but the Es are wrong.
Love.....Jill
 

OldPaint

New Member
more then likely it is an actual font...........BUT given the normal "artistic license" most old wall painters took with each different job they did.
 

SignosaurusRex

Active Member
Its a common sign painters letter style called "Spur Egyptian". The C was executed with some liberty commonly applied to the bottom terminal. Whether or not its available as a font, I can't tell you right off.
 

James Burke

Being a grandpa is more fun than working
Looks like a "personalised" version of the good ol' Copperplate Heavy.

Dang...'twas what I was going to say.

A few issues back, Sign Craft did a piece about old weathered hand painted signs that have more or less become a bit of an artform. I'd say this qualifies.
 

Malkin

Member
Looks very close to Flange BQ Bold

I was reminded of this thread today when I was waiting in line, staring at a Thomas DVD.
 

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Billct2

Active Member
I'm with SignRex, though there are fonts that are similar, this was a common typeface, amoung many that were used, with each painter personalizing them to some extent. It's one of the funny things about typefaces, originally they were designed to mimic the calligraphy they replaced, then there came a time when sign painters were having to copy typesetting fonts and then came computer fonts that mimic hand lettered fonts.
 

RiXaX

New Member
I don't even remember ever hearing the word font until the Gerber machines. Typestyles were called "cases" in the print shops where they set type. Signmen didn't use fonts, the lettered. Letters were drawn on the wall to fit the space. The boldness was determined by how the signman wanted it to fit. We did most of our layouts on the wall also...seldom used patterns.
 

SignosaurusRex

Active Member
not even by pounce or something applicablez??
The guy that did that job probably pulled the letter style from memory. Most likely did not even have a scaled grid drawing and only used a straight edge and chalk to lay it out. Notice how well everything fits and is placed in concert with the space allowed despite the centrally located column section of brick.
 

Billct2

Active Member
I agree, lots of signs/walls got lettered with nothing more than some chalk and straight lines, along with a ruler/straight edge. You would figure out the line length, look at the text that had to fit and do the "math" to come up with the right letter sizes and spacing.
A pounce pattern or scaled sketch was also a common option (especially for me).
 

SignosaurusRex

Active Member
I agree, lots of signs/walls got lettered with nothing more than some chalk and straight lines, along with a ruler/straight edge. You would figure out the line length, look at the text that had to fit and do the "math" to come up with the right letter sizes and spacing.
A pounce pattern or scaled sketch was also a common option (especially for me).

Me too.
I had the honor and sometimes displeasure of working and learning from some of them old-timers and masters. Even got to do a few road trips with some of them...knocking out one wall after another. What a trip...and a beating! Not a day went by that I didn't learn something new. I sure admire and miss those bastards (term of endearment...they know who they are:wink:).
 
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