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Two guys one bucket?

gnubler

Active Member
Or two bucket lifts? Bidding on a job to replace these polycarb panels, one on each side. Panels measure 82"w x 112"h.
Does anyone transport big panels like this rolled up or do you keep them flat? Probably easiest to angle onto a flatbed trailer with side rails and tie them down.
With tall panels like this, do you attach forks and vertical support framing on the bucket to help keep it standing up straight? It's almost 10 ft tall.
I'm contracting out the install but any tips that I could pass on to make the job easier are appreciated.

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Texas_Signmaker

Very Active Signmaker
Using a pan face will make it a million times easier. I'd transport that size face on a trailer. If it's pan, you likely can do it with one bucket and two he/shes/its. If it's a flat face, I'd price out two buckets for sure. I've transported flat polycarb rolled up and ratchet strapped closed. That size though might be tricky. I've also strapped them to the roof rack of my truck.

If it's 10' tall, I would clamp a 2x4 along the middle of the top edge and lift it up with crane/bucket. This would require trucks.
 

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signbrad

New Member
I have installed faces like this by myself out of a bucket in my superman days. Quarter-inch plastic, always with a hanging bar. I used a long 2x4 at the top with the plastic face attached to it by "center-pull" clamps, pulling them off one by one while inserting the face. I often used the strength of the bucket's rotation feature to push (or pull) the face to slide it in place. If the cabinet was badly out of square, there was always a problem (usually on the second side), but usually, it was a matter of working carefully and slowly. But really, for safety, it's a two-person job, two-bucket job. And really, flex faces are best, if you can retrofit.

I don't miss this stuff at all. It's more funner to watch others do it.

Brad in Kansas City
 

Texas_Signmaker

Very Active Signmaker
you know, as soon as you have that face up in the air you will have that gust of wind that will start trying
to spin it, no matter how calm the weather has been up to that point
You run tag lines. That one pic of the BigTex face was installed in 40mph winds. I had the client hold one of the tag lines while I lifted.

And I agree with brad.. flexface that bitch. This one is self tappers and rubber washers. Takes two people but only one bucket. My helper uses duck bills to pull the face while I fasten. Use plenty of fasteners and it's not going anywhere.
 

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netsol

Active Member
You run tag lines. That one pic of the BigTex face was installed in 40mph winds. I had the client hold one of the tag lines while I lifted.

And I agree with brad.. flexface that bitch. This one is self tappers and rubber washers. Takes two people but only one bucket. My helper uses duck bills to pull the face while I fasten. Use plenty of fasteners and it's not going anywhere.
but, like everything, it gets easier after it has surprised you a time or two.
i would obviously install with a single bucket truck, but, i am not easily panicked
 

gnubler

Active Member
Awesome, thanks Tex! Going to file those pics into my sign bible.
I thought about this job last night after I posted...almost thinking it's just too big of a job for me and will probably pass on it. Finding installers is the biggie, I talked to a couple contractors and wasn't inspired by what they said. One of them sounded drunk and said he didn't know how to measure in inches when I told him the size of the panels. LOL. This is what I'm up against around here.

Anyone interested in doing this install for me? I'll let you camp out in the shop, fridge is already stocked with beer.
 

netsol

Active Member
you might ask an electrician or mechanical contractor if they have any interest
we have a few in my area that help each other out, borrow my bucket truck, etc
 

Gino

Premium Subscriber
One guy on a ladder to guide it in and the bucket to push it the rest of the way in. If you have an articulating bucket, one-man breeze.
 

gnubler

Active Member
Thanks for posting those pics. I was wondering how it would even be lifted on the bucket being so tall and that explains it. Clamped at the top and hoisted up in the air. As others stated, that must fun when the wind kicks up.

Netsol - I can't even find an electrician to install electric signs, they're not interested. Everyone's immersed in building housing and can't be bothered with a one-off sign install like this.

Gino - seriously? I can't imagine that being even remotely possible with only one person in a bucket.
 

Texas_Signmaker

Very Active Signmaker
Gnubler.. get out and do it. Get someone (like a friend or family member) to help you with the second bucket. If no one in town can do this sorta thing, then bid it at $10k and worry about it when you get the job. I'm sure for $8k profit you will figure it out.. then you will have the knowledge and confidence to bid on the next one. That sign aint even that high up.. has plenty of room on either side to setup a bucket...it'd be a great one to start with.

Netsol will do it on a ladder for a case of beer because he is not "easily panicked"
 

gnubler

Active Member
I appreciate the encouragement but it would be foolish for me to get into something this big without having a firm plan, and I'm not interested in being involved in the install. Not even sure how I would man handle those huge panels in my shop, they'd take up all my floor space until the install day and I have other jobs going on. You're in a much bigger market with a lot of connections and better equipment...I'm just one small squirrel. I'm going to make some more calls to contractors and see if I can find anyone sober.
 

JBurton

Signtologist
Quarter-inch plastic, always with a hanging bar.
That's about the only way a 9x7 will stay in a cabinet through a minor windstorm. Also need to place it on the front or back in the right spot, so a great survey will make the install sooooo much easier. There may also be another hanger bar on the bottom, but less likely.
For transport at that size, lay them flat on a trailer, cardboard betwixt the two, and some cores on top to get the ratchet strap some leverage.
For install, screw a 6' length of aluminum angle to the bottom of the sign, 3' sticking off one side to hold the weight, set sign on angle, slide in from the top by lifting the leading edge while pulling into the cabinet, pushing poly tends to bow, causing it to bind in the trim.
 

netsol

Active Member
one of the funniest things, a good friend had an illuminated 3x10 sign moved
(relocation in a strip mall)
they lifted the sign with bucket truck (i would have done the same thing)
an impressive gust of wind gave that sign a REAL GOOD spin

i may see jackie this weekend. if she still has the video on her cell phone i will get a copy
 

UberDapr

New Member
Two buckets...!? I'm going 1 bucket 2 guys...
Remove top and side flashings.
2 × 4 planks Wedged at the feet of the bucket. Blanket over bucket. Sign face on 2×4 and send it with both guys in the bucket.
 

ProSignTN

New Member
Polycarbonate at 1/8" would be 49 lbs. 3/16" would be 74 lbs. If your bucket is steel tube it's fairly easy to rig a jib using 2"x4"s. Only remove top and one side of retainer. Poly will bend plenty to attach hanger bar across top using c clamps or as I prefer vise clamps. IF it were 1/8" I'd pull it by hand, 10 years ago I'd have pulled the 3/16" by hand. Re-Install should be much easier, just getting the first corner started.

This is the kind of job everyday installers and service techs do everyday without a second thought.
 
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