need help figuring a price bracket for small sticker?

decaljunkie

New Member
I have a client that is asking for a price on small 4.25"x4.25" all the same design stickers. he need like 50 for now but will be ordering up to a thousand every so often. does someone have a price bracket chart that you use for pricing quantity stickers? thanks
 

CanuckSigns

Active Member
I have a client that is asking for a price on small 4.25"x4.25" all the same design stickers. he need like 50 for now but will be ordering up to a thousand every so often. does someone have a price bracket chart that you use for pricing quantity stickers? thanks

I don't know about you, but 1000 decals isn't exactly a large order, I would offer a 10% discount of the normal price for that.
 

FatCat

Member
so what you price out 1000 decal for at 4.25 inches . thanks

Are these cut vinyl, or printed? If printed, I just go by a flat rate per square foot, doesn't matter what size decal.

If cut, I pretty much do the same thing, but price will vary by the quantity and amount of detail/weeding/work involved.
 

Mosh

Member
What material? 3551 with 290 lam $1 each based on $8 sq foot price.
something cheaper with no lam $.20-$.50 all depends on the cutting time and weeding, will they need tape. Are these full bleed? I can go on....
 

Fred Weiss

Merchant Member
We've always offered a volume discount based on the dollar amount of the order. $200+ = 5%, $500+ = 10%, and $1,000+ = 15%. We do this because we recognize that setting up (opening a job, loading materials, outputting the job etc.) to producing a job is a separate and nearly flat cost from the time and materials consumed in producing any job. Thus, that flat set up becomes less of a factor in a larger order.

Example:

Production of 50 Labels @ $1.00 each = $50.00
Set up cost = $50.00
Total = $100.00
Cost per label = $2.00

Production of 1,000 Labels @ $1.00 each = $1,000.00
Set up cost = $50.00
Total = $1,050.00
Cost per label = $1.05

We recognize that our discount schedule does not exactly match up to the logic, but it's easier and also accomplishes the second objective of generating larger orders.
 

fresh

Member
I have Discount Labels' price guide. If I'm doing a small run, I try to make sure that I'm at least double the piece price of their smallest run with similar specs. I also don't do large runs in house because it is WAY more economical to have someone who is set up to labels produce them.
 

Mikeb64

New Member
I use Estimate software for all of my pricing. I do believe there is a quantity discount feature in there.
 

binki

Member
It depends on what is involved but we do what has been already suggested. For print/cut we charge a setup and then per/sqft charge. Volume orders get discounts.
 

rjssigns

Active Member
We use three tiered pricing. All decal orders are priced per square inch. Volume dictates tier. This works for us. Your results will probably vary wildly.
 

bob

Member
We use three tiered pricing. All decal orders are priced per square inch. Volume dictates tier. This works for us. Your results will probably vary wildly.

The problem with tiered pricing, or volume discounts [same thing, different name] is that if the discount is more than the unit price you end up in some ridiculous situations. I stopped into a donut shop may years ago and was informed that the price was $0.10 apiece and $1.00 a dozen. I asked the clerk if I bought 11 donuts would she really charge me $1.10 and keep a straight face. She went into an innumeric coma.

Much better to price on an exponential curve primarily based on area. Or on whatever you primarily base your pricing. You avoid those really silly situations like the donut shop above and volume discounts are inherently built into the curve.
 

Locals Find!

New Member
The problem with tiered pricing, or volume discounts [same thing, different name] is that if the discount is more than the unit price you end up in some ridiculous situations. I stopped into a donut shop may years ago and was informed that the price was $0.10 apiece and $1.00 a dozen. I asked the clerk if I bought 11 donuts would she really charge me $1.10 and keep a straight face. She went into an innumeric coma.

Much better to price on an exponential curve primarily based on area. Or on whatever you primarily base your pricing. You avoid those really silly situations like the donut shop above and volume discounts are inherently built into the curve.

How many years ago was that bob?? Did they just invent the donut??
 
I gave up a long time ago, trying to find a simple formula for pricing stickers. Every sticker company I've subcontracted to or competed with seems to have a completely different method of pricing. It's quite common to find one company priced at 5x or 10x another for a similar order.

Figure out your costs (operating costs * labour + material) and then mark it up however much you want to mark it up. Make a spreadsheet to save yourself time punching numbers.

Using this pricing method, what will generally happen is you'll beat the competition in a lot of areas where they have a high markup (and you'll still get the markup you want) and they'll get the jobs where their margin is slim. Win-win.
 

Gino

Premium Subscriber
Back before you were born,most likely.



Ha..... presuming he was born and not found under a rock.


Math is math Addie, what does a time element have to do with price, other than inflation if it's decades ?? Addie, I hope 'decade' isn't too large of a word for you. :rolleyes:
 

gabagoo

Member
Small decals and small quantities really require a hefty setup charge to make them viable or very high sq ft pricing. I had one client last year, verbally ask how much it would cost to run 200 decals that were pretty small. When I calculated the cost and added a setup it came out to somewhere around $85.00 which I knew was way to low so I boosted it to $125 and told her verbally $125.00. The p.o. show up the next day at $1.25 each for 200 decals....so basically $250.00. Normally I may have fixed this issue, but I know that this customer marks my stuff up by a %age, which means that their customer obviously accepted the price they asked and in the end we both made more $$$$. :smile:
 
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